Review 19 Search Page
 




 
New Reviews

Mary L. Mullen
NOVEL INSTITUTIONS: ANACHRONISM, IRISH NOVELS AND NINETEENTH-CENTURY REALISM
(Edinburgh, 2019) xi + 252 pp.
Reviewed by Patrick R. O'Malley on 2019-12-31
This book makes a key intervention in both nineteenth-century studies and Irish studies by considering in conjunction with each other British and Irish novels that were written more or less contemporaneously.
Click here to read the full review.

Melissa Bailes
QUESTIONING NATURE: BRITISH WOMEN'S SCIENTIFIC WRITING AND LITERARY ORIGINALITY, 1750-1830
(Virginia: University of Virginia Press, 2017) vii + 263 pp.
Reviewed by Philipp Erchinger on 2019-12-12
It seems fair to say that for quite some time, the work of women writers such as Anna Letitia Barbauld and Charlotte Smith has been moving toward the center of Romantic studies.
Click here to read the full review.

James Watt
BRITISH ORIENTALISMS, 1759-1835
(Cambridge, 2019)
Reviewed by Gillen D'Arcy Wood on 2019-12-06
This excellent book is a pessimistic study, skeptical of liberal narratives past and present.
Click here to read the full review.

Katherine Bergren
THE GLOBAL WORDSWORTH: ROMANTICISM OUT OF PLACE
(Bucknell, 2018) 226 pp.
Reviewed by Nikki Hessell on 2019-11-13
The full title of Katherine Bergren's marvellous book says it all: William Wordsworth is both a profoundly global poet, influential all over the world, and yet also acutely out of place in many of the locales where his poetry landed.
Click here to read the full review.

David O'Shaughnessy, ed.
IRELAND, ENLIGHTENMENT, AND THE ENGLISH STAGE, 1740-1820
(Cambridge, 2019), xvi+268pp.
Reviewed by on 2019-11-04
The British Enlightenment owed a large debt to Ireland.
Click here to read the full review.