Review 19: An Online Review of New Books on English and American Literature of the 19th Century
 

 
Kathleen Anderson
JANE AUSTEN'S WOMEN: AN INTRODUCTION
(SUNY, 2018) xxv + 293 pp.
Reviewed by June Sturrock on 2019-10-07.

Kathleen Anderson founds the arguments of this book on a detailed knowledge of Austen's six novels acquired over years of reading, teaching, and thinking about them. A brief introduction leads to eight chapters organized into three parts: "Women and the Body: Strength, Sex, and Austenian Wellness"; "Women's Natures: Mood, Mind, Spirit, and Female Giftedness" and "Women and Others: The Female Self...
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Adena Spingarn
UNCLE TOM FROM MARTYR TO TRAITOR
(Stanford, 2018) xii + 252 pp.
Reviewed by Debra J. Rosenthal on 2019-10-07.

We all know that Uncle Tom died a martyr. No -- wait -- he died a traitor to his race. Was Tom a strong, admirable father who sacrificed himself in a Christ-like fashion to prevent his wife and children from being sold, or was he a shuffling, subservient sell-out of black Americans whose "yes massa" talk reinforced ideas of black inferiority? This bifurcated view of Harriet Beecher Stowe's most...
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Jill Galvan and Elsie Michie, eds.
REPLOTTING MARRIAGE IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
(Ohio State, 2018) v + 269 pp.
Reviewed by Colleen M. Kropp on 2019-10-05.

Marriage in the nineteenth-century is critically central, symbolically and structurally, to the way the British novel emerges as a genre. How do you even begin replotting a deeply cultural, social event like marriage? Jill Galvan and Elsie Michie offer a provocative compilation of essays that explores what it means to rethink the British "marriage plot," which they describe as "the phrase [that]...
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Thomas H. Ford
WORDSWORTH AND THE POETICS OF AIR
(Cambridge, 2018) x + 269 pp.
Reviewed by Scott Hess on 2019-09-16.

The scope of Ford's book is much broader than its title suggests. While William Wordsworth's poetry does feature intermittently as a recurring touchstone, the book ranges widely over many Romantic discourses and disciplines, both British and German, to demonstrate the significance of atmosphere as a major trope of the Romantic period. Ford documents how this widely diffused interest in atmosphere...
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Christopher Taylor
EMPIRE OF NEGLECT: THE WEST INDIES IN THE WAKE OF BRITISH LIBERALISM
(Duke, 2018) xi+307 pp.
Reviewed by on 2019-08-26.

This is a brilliantly conceived and beautifully executed study of British West Indian writing between approximately 1776 (the year that The Wealth of Nations was published among other world-historical occurrences) and 1860. The study's key archival "attunement," to use one of the author's favored terms, is to the various ways that West Indian Anglophone writers rejected the liberal market...
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