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Jayne Thomas
TENNYSON ECHOING WORDSWORTH
(Edinburg, 2019) 210pp.
Reviewed by Thomas J. Brennan, S.J. on 2020-02-10
This book offers a careful and comprehensive discussion of the formative influences of William Wordsworth's work on that of Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
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Anne C. McCarthy
AWFUL PARENTHESIS: SUSPENSION AND THE SUBLIME IN ROMANTIC AND VICTORIAN POETRY
(Toronto UP, 2018) x + 218 pp.
Reviewed by Sasha Tamar Strelitz on 2020-02-10
Throughout its intellectual history extending as far back as Longinus, a central characteristic of the sublime is reflection, mostly in the emotional realm as opposed to the rational.
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Adrian Wisnicki
FIELDWORK OF EMPIRE, 1840-1900: INTERCULTURAL DYNAMICS IN THE PRODUCTION OF BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY LITERATURE
(Routledge, 2019), xviii +205 pp.
Reviewed by Laura Franey on 2020-02-01
This book offers precisely the kind of dense, complex, intercultural reading of Victorian travelers, their journeys, and their literary and cartographic productions that scholars of travel writing on Africa have envisioned since the boom in such criticism began in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
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Sheshalatha Reddy
BRITISH EMPIRE AND THE LITERATURE OF REBELLION: REVOLTING BODIES, LABORING SUBJECTS
(Palgrave, 2017) xl + 271 pp.
Reviewed by Aaron Worth on 2020-01-21
Episodes of violent social and political resistance make us, or ought to make us, peculiarly aware of the framing power of language.
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David Francis Taylor
THE POLITICS OF PARODY: A LITERARY HISTORY OF CARICATURE 1760-1830
(Yale, 2018) xii + 304pp.
Reviewed by Brian Maidment on 2020-01-15
At one point in this original and sophisticated study of the "literariness" of caricature, David Taylor notes, with a nod to Bourdieu, that "something vitally important gets lost when we read pictures as nothing more or other than language"(43).
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