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PASSING THE TORCH

Fourteen years ago, with the generous sponsorship of Dartmouth College, I launched Review 19. Since that time, thanks to the good counsel of our advisors and editors and the indispensable work of hundreds of reviewers, we have assessed nearly 700 books on British and American literature of the nineteenth century.

But for everything there is a season, and my own season is ending.

Given my age (84) and declining health, I have decided to step down from the editorship by the end of this calendar year. Fortunately, the Provost’s Office of Dartmouth will fund the review for at least three more years, and I have also found a new editor.

He is Andrew Foust, who has been technically managing the website for many years. Since he combines digital wizardry with academic achievement (he holds a PhD in English from the University of California at Irvine), he will bring fresh energy to the editing of this review. The only change we’ll make—with regret—is to discontinue reviewing studies of American literature. This will allow us to sharpen our focus on the study of British literature.

To help Andy, two new Associate Editors will replace Lila Harper and Lisa Ann Robertson, who have been serving us so well for the past few years. James McKusick, probably best known for his Geen Writing: Romanticism and Ecology (Palagrave 2000), will edit reviews of books on Romantic era literature. Mary L. Mullen, author of the prize-winning Novel Institutions: Anachronism, Irish Novels and Nineteenth-Century Realism (Edinburgh, 2019), will oversee reviews of Victorian studies.

Finally, a personal note. Earlier this year, Bloomsbury Academic published my latest book, Politics and Literature at the Dawn of World War II. Since this book has almost nothing to do with the nineteenth century, it cannot be reviewed here, but for a brief description and some very generous blurbs, see https://www.jamesheff.com.

My thanks, yet again, to all who have contributed so much to this review and to all--especially Andy Foust--who will carry its torch into the future.

James Heffernan

Review19@dartmouth.edu

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