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Cian Duffy
BRITISH ROMANTICISM AND DENMARK
(Edinburgh, 2022) 246 pp.
Reviewed by Marie-Louise Svane on 2023-05-22
International Romanticism
In recent academic publications on European cultural history, questions about nation building, nationalism, and national identity have played a prominent part.
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Maureen McCue and Sophie Thomas, eds.
THE EDINBURGH COMPANION TO ROMANTICISM AND THE ARTS
(Edinburgh, 2023) xx + 548 pp.
Reviewed by William Galperin on 2023-05-19
Romantic Art
A key question posed by this collection springs from its title.
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Susan J. Wolfson
A GREETING OF THE SPIRIT: SELECTED POETRY OF JOHN KEATS WITH COMMENTARIES
(Belknap / Harvard, 2022) xv + 457 pp.
Reviewed by Robert S. White on 2023-04-22
Romantic Poetry
This handsomely produced and very hefty volume is destined to become required reading for all Keats lovers, students, and scholars.
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Kerri Andrews and Sue Edney, eds.
HANNAH MORE IN CONTEXT
(Routledge, 2022) 242 pp.
Reviewed by Natasha Duquette on 2023-04-15
Romantic Literature
Hannah More's historical contributions to anti-slavery activism have brought her further into the twenty-first-century public eye, which has in turn generated more nuanced scholarly approaches to her writing.
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Richard C. Sha
IMAGINATION AND SCIENCE IN ROMANTICISM
(Johns Hopkins, 2018) xi + 327 pp.
Reviewed by James Robert Allard on 2023-03-31
Romantic Literature
We have long understood that certain key terms like "nature" and "revolution," to cite only two examples, are at home in a variety of seemingly disparate texts and contexts in the Romantic Century, even as they often prove frustratingly difficult to define or circumscribe in any meaningful way.
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Francesca Mackenney
BIRDSONG, SPEECH AND POETRY
(Cambridge, 2022) x + 184 pp.
Reviewed by Hee Eun Helen Lee on 2023-03-22
Animal Studies
Francesca Mackenney frames an original argument on birdsong and science by asking how human beings have experienced birdsong and explaining how they have "translated" it into human words and phrases.
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